Well, for one thing, the plot is so complex that it is sometimes difficult to follow. We have to wait a further 30 minutes or so for an explanation of why she did what she did. Welcome to the Punch This was followed by the second, and the third, and continued to do so until the end finally came, with a twist that was visible from a mile away and a convoluted plot that had to be explained through exposition about 10 minutes before the film ended! So, why is it no better than an averagely good film? This is most definitely a film that requires the viewer’s undivided attention – so much so that watching it sometimes seems to be much more of a chore than a pleasure. Stylish to within an inch of its life, the fantastically brooding score to match the fantastically brooding faces on screen, and the gorgeous photography carry it through with unexpected panache. For all of the films good moments it has its bad and ultimately, the bad simply overpowered the good.

Inspired by Hong Kong ‘heroic bloodshed’ flicks, this hardnosed cops ‘n’ robbers tale certainly lives up to its name. If you’re looking to be entertained for just under a couple of hours without questioning too much, this is the film for you. But, with the serious lack of character development and exploration of their implied back stories, the film finds itself lying flat on its gun riddled back after its 99 minute runtime. This gives Lewinsky the opportunity to try to apprehend him for his past misdemeanours. There has also been a noticeable TV advertising campaign in the UK, aimed at plugging the film’s supposed entertainment value. But it is ultimately also a bleak and empty one that, despite the money and behind the camera talent expended on it, barely raises itself above the level of a competent thriller. It’s a slick, glossy thriller that looks expensive.

Top performances, decent pacing, and an ending which refuses to settle it all in quite the neat and tidy way one would expect.

Relationships between characters felt shallow and under developed, making empathy nigh on impossible and ultimately, leaving me somewhat bored of the whole thing. But now, I find myself wondering whether they knew welcomd that I didn’t!

But it is ultimately also a bleak and empty one that, despite the money and behind the camera talent expended on it, barely raises itself above the level of a competent thriller. Not because of the storyline, no. Underground stations and trains, buses and billboards in London seem to be festooned subttiles posters advertising “Welcome to the Pdonapisi.

It’s been a long time since I have seen so much advance publicity for a film. The tale is set in a blue-tinted, modern day London.

Unfortunately, about 15 minutes in, my first ‘gripe’ smacked me in the face from McAvoy’s performance no opdnapisi Stylish to within an inch of its life, the fantastically brooding score to match the fantastically brooding faces on screen, and the gorgeous photography carry it through with unexpected panache. It is beautifully filmed and is a visually confident film that is a delight to look at.

I am not surprised that so much effort is being made to convince potential viewers of the film’s credentials. This gives his nemesis, detective Max Lewinsky, one last chance to catch the man he’s always been engljsh. There is, for example, one scene in which the behaviour of a podnapissi which ultimately leads to her being killed is simply inexplicable.

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Nothing you don’t expect, but basically what ‘The Sweeney’ wanted to be. The little niggles in the form of conveniently placed tools, bad aim etc.

Welcome to the Punch (2013) – English subtitles

It pulls us in straight away. For all of the films good moments it has its bad and ultimately, the bad simply overpowered the good. This gives Lewinsky the opportunity to try to apprehend him for his past misdemeanours. If like me you expect more from a movie with a cast and the budget shown, prepare to leave the screen feeling as if you’ve been poked a few times in the arm, hardly punched.

He has now returned to London because his son has been shot and injured and is critically ill. Special mention must go to Shane Meadows favourite Johnny Harris who, as a cold-blooded ex-military henchman, exudes a barely-restrained predatory animalism, familiar to those who saw him in This is England ‘ Unfortunately, not a single one of my ish London based Facebook friends could accompany me to the free advanced preview of the film and, at first, I must admit that I was very disappointed.

Because from a technical stand point, the film looks and sounds great. And it is certainly the case that “Welcome to the Punch” is a stylish film. Inspired by Hong Kong ‘heroic bloodshed’ flicks, this hardnosed cops ‘n’ robbers tale certainly lives up to its name.

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If you’re looking to be entertained for just under a couple of hours without questioning too much, this is the film for you. Max Lewinsky James McAvoy is still pretty hung up over being shot by bad guy Jacob Sternwood Mark Strong and gets his one chance at revenge when Sternwood returns to London after his son Ruan Elyes Gabel is shot himself and severely injured.

Especially when the people using them are supposedly some of englisy best marksmen around. Although “Welcome to the Punch” is a reasonably entertaining film, it is ultimately a disappointing one. Welcome to povnapisi Punch opens nationwide on 27th March. But, with the serious lack of character development and exploration of their implied back stories, the film finds itself lying flat on its gun riddled back after its 99 minute runtime.

It seems to me to have been heavily influenced by some of the recently ths TV crime series emanating from continental Europe primarily Scandinaviasuch as “The Killing”, “Borgen” and “Spiral”. This is most definitely a film that requires the viewer’s undivided attention – so much so that watching it sometimes seems to be much more of a chore than a pleasure.

It is clear that “Welcome to the Punch” has a substantial PR budget attached to it. Welcome to the Punch James McAvoy’s supercop exhibits a dogged intensity in his hunt for Mark Strong’s antiheroic supercrim. In addition, it is sometimes difficult to discern, amidst the frequent scenes of gun violence and mayhem, exactly which character has been injured or killed.

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Welcome To The Punch made me leave the cinema feeling very confused. McAvoy gives a very good performance as the obsessive detective hellbent on revenge despite occasional lapses with his London accent!

I honestly found myself asking whether this could actually be the British ‘Heat’ after the first 10 minutes or so. We find ourselves almost immediately invested in both the egnlish James McAvoy as Max Lewinsky, detective cop chap whom we’re meant to root for and antagonist a stern Mark Strong playing naughty bad guy, Jacob Sternwoodwilling the story to tell us more about these two characters and the motivations behind their actions.

Welcome to the Punch YIFY subtitles

So why not just tell us? Well, for one thing, the plot is so complex that it is sometimes difficult to follow. However, it is also a bleak film with apart from one funny scene that is a strangely effective mixture of humour and tension little to lighten its almost unremittingly depressive milieu. That and podnnapisi pacing issues aside though, the terrific performances from a top-notch who’s who British cast, including James McEvoy, who only has one obvious accent slip in the entire film, Andrea Riseborough, who can do anything, and the brooding, incredible Mark Strong, who almost steals the thing doing little more than looking around.

The acting englihs, for the most part, good – there is very te support from the likes of Peter Mullan, Daniel Mays and David Morrissey.

Subtitles | Welcome to the Punch | | kF8l

The audience needs to know why certain things are happening surely? During their heated cat-and-mouse game, the two uncover a conspiracy much bigger than their own dispute. None of the questions that the film raises in our minds as we progress through its ‘narrative’ are answered and I was left feeling cheated every time.

The soundtrack too is spot on.

The cast deliver strong performances with what material they have bar McAvoy, surprisingly, who gave one too many cliched reactions which caricatured our hero and made us less sympathetic to engllsh plight. Eran Creevy, writer and director sets the stage clearly with an opening sequence that plays out in London’s glossy, glass and steel covered Canary Wharf.

We have to wait a further 30 minutes or so for an explanation of why she did what she did. Sadly another missed opportunity for British cinema. This was followed by the second, and the third, and continued to do so until the end finally came, with a twist that was visible from a mile away and a convoluted plot that had to be explained through exposition about 10 minutes before the film ended!

A visually and audibly stylish action crime caper that ultimately shoots itself in its foot.