The Criterion P takes a wild shift from the Tartan DVD colors looking brighter and more orange – especially notable in the skin tones. Inevitably, Narayama Bushiko becomes a haunting allegory on the perils of blind allegiance, martyrdom, and repression – a humanist reflection of the profound introspection, cultural erosion, and ideological ambivalence of postwar Japan. Based on the novel by Shichiro Fukuzawa, Narayama Bushiko is a haunting and deeply affecting portrait of love and humanity struggling against the rigidity of tradition, obedience, and sense of duty. This new Animeigo edition is dual-layered and is superior to the old, now out-of-print, I. Using jarring, anachronistic imagery and unusually stylized artificial lighting, Keisuke Kinoshita presents a relevant examination of the pervasive national ideology of wartime Japan that underscores the dichotomous, and often self-destructive conflict between personal conscience and social conformity: This haunting, kabuki-inflected version of a Japanese folk legend is set in a remote mountain village where food is scarce and tradition dictates that citizens who have reached their seventieth year must be carried to the summit of Mount Narayama and left there to die. This director’s films are some of the most interesting – afraid of taboos and fringe topics – and I think this is a fantastic choice for the Masters of Cinema to have undertaken in the new format.

The Masters of Cinema disc is darker with richer colors. From Mizogushi and Ozu to Kurosawa and Oshima, Japanese film-making has created a whole tradition which has acquired universal acclaim due to its immense insight and contribution to world cinema. The only extras are some trailer and teasers and a liner notes booklet featuring an essay by Philip Kemp. A booklet featuring an essay by critic Philip Kemp. The Criterion P takes a wild shift from the Tartan DVD colors looking brighter and more orange – especially notable in the skin tones. Subtitles are certainly more thorough and give the three-tired option of ‘Full’, ‘Limited’ or ‘captions only’. All things considering it is very watchable, if not stellar, and supports the Japanese audio with optional English subtitles.

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It has less artifacts, is smoother, slightly better skin tones and is progressive where the single-layered Region 3 release is interlaced – see ‘combing’ in last capture! The font is a bit heavy and bright yellow but these are my only complaints.

This effort is much appreciated. Tartan – Region 0 – PAL vs. All things considering it is very watchable, if not stellar, and supports the Japanese audio with optional English subtitles.

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Narayama bushiko (Imamura) (DVD)

Based on the novel by Shichiro Fukuzawa, Narayama Bushiko is a haunting and deeply affecting portrait of love and humanity struggling against the rigidity of tradition, obedience, and sense of duty. The Blu-ray disc is region ‘B’-locked. Japanese Dolby Digital 2. Gushiko only extras are some trailer and teasers and a liner notes booklet featuring an essay by Philip Kemp.

The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. I t’s a pretty dramatic improvement over the less-than-stellar DVDs.

June 10th, Keep Case Chapters: It’s clean and progressive – looks nqrayama as good as it will for the time being – and some effort has been put into the subtitle translation s. There is some nice grain, contrast almost achieves moiring via the pitch black-levels without achieving it.

There is more information in the frame on the 1.

Overall, it’s like seeing the film afresh. The Horizontal is the time in minutes. One has to find a new wife since he’s widowed, another hasn’t been with a woman before, and the third one needs to be taught manners.

The Balled subtotles Narayama is an exemplary feature of Imamura’s cinematic genre. It’s dual-layered and progressive and very much in-line with what we have come to expect from the, precise and professional, MoC group.

Ballad of Narayama Blu-ray – Keisuke Kinoshita

The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc. Subtitles are certainly more thorough and give the three-tired option of ‘Full’, ‘Limited’ or ‘captions only’.

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Criterion – Region ‘A’ – Blu-ray. Using jarring, anachronistic imagery and unusually stylized artificial lighting, Keisuke Kinoshita presents a relevant examination of the pervasive national ideology of wartime Japan that underscores the dichotomous, and often self-destructive conflict between personal conscience and social conformity: Japanese Dolby Digital 2.

There are new, optional English subtitles in a clean and clear white font. The great legacy of Japanese cinema finds in Imamura a gifted heir. Audio is via a cleaner linear PCM track and subtitle translations seemed more descriptive. English Full, Limited or captions onlyNone.

Aside from the interlacing the I. The Masters of Cinema disc is darker with richer colors. But there are several loose ends within her own family to tie up first. The Criterion P takes a wild shift from the Tartan DVD colors looking brighter and more orange – especially notable in the skin tones. Criterion – Region ‘A’ Blu-ray – January Tartan – Region 0 – PAL. The DVDs both had some rough patches in the audio either inherent in the production or the best source available and while they still seem to exist and much smoother and far less noticeable via the DTS-HD Master 2.

This haunting, kabuki-inflected version of a Japanese folk legend is set in a remote mountain village where food is scarce and tradition dictates that citizens who have reached their seventieth year must be carried to the summit of Mount Narayama and left there to die.